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Posts Tagged ‘writing prompt’

Your Monday Prompt #48

Write a story about a character who is amazing at reaching out to help people in need. Consider how much this sort of work calls them to do good things on behalf of those who are less fortunate. Let the emotion they feel in this (the specific sort of work they do is up to you) guide their characterization. Give this exercise fifteen minutes of your time and then read and immediately follow the directions for the second part of the exercise.

Put that character in a situation where the tables are turned. They are now the person in dire need, the person who is less fortunate. How does this affect them? What does this change in their mind? How do they reach out for help (if they do at all)? Give this portion of the exercise an additional fifteen minutes of your time.

Write it up and see what happens.

-nm

Your Monday Prompt #45

For the forty-fifth Monday Recommendation, write a story revolving around something to do with the number forty-five. Maybe it’s someone’s forty-fifth birthday. Perhaps there’s a murder with a .45 handgun. Possibly it’s someone’s marathon number. See if you can let the number forty-five feed the theme of the story somehow. Careful, though – don’t let the theme or the number control your story; that’s up to your characters. Give this exercise forty-five minutes of your time. 🙂

Write it up and see what happens.

-nm

Your Monday Prompt #44

(For non-regular readers, I present an original writing prompt every Monday. Here’s one for this week.)

Write a story about a character who uses their time in nature for self-reflection. Maybe they’re thinking about their childhood while sitting on a dock. Perhaps they’re turning their marriage over and over while walking a trail. Or possibly they’re finally making a decision to move on with their lives as they stare into a campfire. Use the setting of nature to its fullest potential in terms of sensory writing (include them all if you can: sight, sound, smell, touch, taste) and let it serve as a metaphor to reflect the character’s emotional state. Give this exercise fifteen minutes of your time. Double points if you write this story while in nature yourself. Triple word score if you write this story while in the same nature setting as your character.

Write it up and see what happens.

-nm

Your Monday Prompt #42

Write about a character or characters who are searching for someone. Perhaps a young man is scanning the crowd at a club, looking for his ex-girlfriend. Maybe a search party is wading through tall grass, hoping they find a little girl safe and sound. Or possibly a resident advisor is stalking the halls of a residence hall, dead-set on discovering the source of the drunken hollering they heard a moment before. Whatever your approach, try to keep the emotion behind the search at the forefront of the story. Give this exercise fifteen minutes of your time.

Write it up and see what happens.

-nm

Your Monday Prompt #41

Take a character in a story you’ve already written and write a story about them that takes place exactly one year prior. This exercise should help you get to know your character a little better. This new story doesn’t have to be related to your already-existing story whatsoever, other than the character(s) who appear in both. Give this exercise fifteen minutes of your time.

Write it up and see what happens.

-nm

Your Monday Prompt #40

Write a story about a character who finally accomplishes a tremendous goal… only to discover they have a glaring setback requiring them to do a little more work and the clock is ticking. Maybe they’re a runner who miscalculated how many laps they’ve finished in a race. Perhaps they’re in a weight-loss competition and discover their home scale doesn’t match the official scale. Or possibly they finished every last piece of paperwork for their presentation only to find one last important document left unfinished. Use the contrast in your character’s emotional state – from being satisfied and safe to worried and frantic – as the driving force behind this story.

Give this exercise fifteen minutes of your time.

-nm

And the winner of the "Summer Breeze" contest is…

Peter, a.k.a. wordshiv!

Congratulations to Peter for winning our “Summer Breeze” Contest. You can read his winning entry here. Peter will receive a copy of “The 3 A.M. Epiphany” by Brian Kiteley, a book filled with over 200 unique writing exercises and prompts sure to inspire your summer season of writing.

3am-epiphany

Thanks to everyone who entered our fourth contest at Scrawlers.com. We had 50 entries, making this our largest contest yet, and we appreciate everyone who tried their hand at writing a story or making comments. You can expect another contest at Scrawlers before summer’s end, and we hope you stay with us in the coming months.

Keep writing,

-nm